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Sculpture artist brings new perspective on the healing process
by Krystal Bick
Dec 04, 2008 | 1374 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Tribune/Krystal Bick - Internationally acclaimed artist Cork Marcheschi stands beside his sculpture “Column that Supports the Sky; Homage to Brancusi” that was installed Wednesday at Renown Regional Medical Center’s Fianna Healing Garden.
Tribune/Krystal Bick - Internationally acclaimed artist Cork Marcheschi stands beside his sculpture “Column that Supports the Sky; Homage to Brancusi” that was installed Wednesday at Renown Regional Medical Center’s Fianna Healing Garden.
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“I’m a little speechless,” Cork Marcheschi said, taking a step back to watch the installation of several sculptures at Renown Regional Medical Center’s Fianna Healing Garden. “Seeing everything in this situation … ”

He stepped back and folded his arms.

Speechless.

Marcheschi, an internationally acclaimed artist who has displayed more than 50 of his sculptures all over the United States and Europe, brought three of his latest pieces to be installed in the healing garden at the hospital Wednesday morning.

And despite his widespread popularity, the San Francisco-based artist was rather humble, happy to be part of what has become an integral part of the hospital itself.

“When you’re in a hospital, there are a lot of important issues on your mind,” Marcheschi said. “I wanted to allow the work to interact with people. This (healing garden) has become as equally important as the medication you receive here.”

The intimately designed garden is intended for both hospital patients and family members to reflect in while staying at the hospital, and while still under construction, Marcheschi is hopeful that his work will help with that healing process.

Among the installed pieces were both the rotating metallic sculpture “Circle of Squares” and the electrically lit “Column that Supports the Sky; Homage to Brancusi” adding to the already installed “Wind Column.”

A teacher at the Pilchuck School of Glass, Marchesci is an avid fan of detail, noting the intended metaphors behind each piece and how they interact with the hospital itself.

“It’s always really a matter of the situation the work is in,” Marcheschi said, mentioning that he worked constantly on these featured pieces for a year and a half. “Everything is absolutely unique.”

Turkey Stremmel, owner of Stremmel Gallery in Reno and a fan of Marcheschi’s work, was instrumental in getting him on board for the project.

“He’s got a great eye for design,” Stremmel said. “And he’s very involved with the healing arts. His work is very magical.”

Such magic, Marchesci notes, comes from people, a connection that he said he hopes is something visitors take away from his sculpture work.

“It’s comforting (for people) to come in contact with something that is bigger than their situation,” Marcheschi said, looking up at his column that he calls a “connection between earth and sky.”

“Seeing it when your mind is somewhere else, that’s magic and I hope it speaks to them in a voice they can relate to.”
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