Check Out Our Sports Photo Galleries Contact Us
R-E-S-P-E-C-T: Third graders find out what it means to them with new dictionaries from Sparks Rotary Club
by Jessica Garcia
Dec 13, 2009 | 2840 views | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend | print
<a href= mailto:dreid@dailysparkstribune.com>Tribune/Debra Reid</a> - Bud Beasley Elementary School students inspected their free dictionaries last week. All third graders in the school district will receive the books from the Sparks Rotary Club.
Tribune/Debra Reid - Bud Beasley Elementary School students inspected their free dictionaries last week. All third graders in the school district will receive the books from the Sparks Rotary Club.
slideshow
SPARKS — At the beginning of the year, Principal Susan Kehoe at Bud Beasley Elementary School said one of the first words her students learned about was respect. Since then, they’ve been practicing the concept: Students say “Excuse me” when they pass by and they raise their hands when they have a question.

Perhaps Beasley’s third graders will now pick up a few other words about with the gift of their own personal dictionary, donated by the Sparks Rotary Club.

Rotarian Tim Griffin distributed copies of “The Best Dictionary for Students,” a user-friendly dictionary for youth, to several Bud Beasley classes Thursday. Griffin said it’s a 10-year tradition to help these kids. The club is on a mission to visit every Washoe County school before the Christmas break to deliver the dictionaries.

“They’re also real good for me,” he said, sharing that he doesn’t spell well.

Parker Walton, a third grader in Debbie Hildebrand’s class, said the gift was “very cool.”

“It’s my first one,” he said. “I feel blessed that (Griffin) can come in and take the time to give these dictionaries.”

Walton, 9, said his class is often assigned to look up words for a “Dictionary Detective” worksheet on which they must write down words and their definitions.

Students in Joi Carmen’s class were eager to get their dictionaries and look up “respect” to win a candy bar as part of Griffin’s contest to see who could find the term first.

Nine-year-old Tori Baer said her sister also had a dictionary at home.

“She’s not getting this one,” Tori said, sharing that she’s used to learning big words at a young age.

Travis Riley, 8, said, “I remember learning ‘meteorologist’ … and ‘Memorial Day’ in first grade.”

The Sparks Rotary Club sponsors an annual free fishing day for kids at the Sparks Marina and helps with scholarships for high school students.

“This is not your brother’s or sister’s, it’s not your friends, it’s yours,” said Griffin, a former Reed High School principal who also worked at Beasley.

Kehoe said the gesture to help the students was appreciated.

“Teachers have class sets, but now they’ll be able to use one at home as well,” she said. “A lot of kids don’t have dictionaries at home.”
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
Featured Businesses