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Health Department treats Sparks areas for mosquito abatement
by Tribune Staff
Jul 10, 2013 | 1334 views | 0 0 comments | 39 39 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Vector-Borne Disease Specialists Jeff Jeppson, left, and Will Lumpkin dump pesticides into a dispensing hopper aboard a helicopter in south Reno Wednesday morning to help suppress the mosquito population in the Truckee Meadows wetlands.
Vector-Borne Disease Specialists Jeff Jeppson, left, and Will Lumpkin dump pesticides into a dispensing hopper aboard a helicopter in south Reno Wednesday morning to help suppress the mosquito population in the Truckee Meadows wetlands.
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Washoe Country Health Department dropped pesticide pellets via helicopter Wednesday morning.
Washoe Country Health Department dropped pesticide pellets via helicopter Wednesday morning.
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The Washoe Country Health District treated Sparks wetlands, starting bright and early Wednesday morning.

With the local mosquito population growing, the Washoe County Health Department dropped pesticide pellets via helicopter, killing mosquito larvae, preventing them from maturing and flying.

Treatment started in the South Meadows area and continued throughout the rest of Wednesday morning as prevention crews moved north to Sparks. The Sparks areas treated included Kiley Ranch and Wingfield Springs. The deposit of the pesticide pellets will prevent mosquitos from spreading diseases such as West Nile Virus and encephalitis.

“We survey these wetlands and ponds all year round,” said Phil Ulibarri, the Washoe County Health Department’s public information officer. “There is more stagnant water in the area than people realize. This year, we have treated these areas three times and intend to treat two more times in the upcoming months.”

As the summer heat continues to rises, the threat of mosquitoes also increase. Clark County already experienced its first West Nile Virus case.

To prevent mosquito bites and keep the insects from entering homes and work spaces, Ulibarri encourages everyone to wear long sleeves and cover holes in doors and windows. If there is any standing water in the near vicinity, including unused and not working swimming pools and hot tubs, remove as soon as possible. Mosquitos can also breed in dark, closed containers such as trash cans. Keep trash cans closed securely and monitor their use and location.

If there is a stagnant pool or water vessel near your house and you wish to have it removed, call the Washoe Country Vector Control at 785-4599.

The Washoe Country Health District monitors and controls the Sparks area’s stagnant water and the spread of the West Nile Virus using various methods, including carbon dioxide traps and a sentinel flock chicken, in which they sample the bird’s blood for any anomalies.

For questions or information about the pesticide treatment, call the Washoe County Health Department at 328-2400.
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