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Reed looks to continue picking apart opposing defenses
by Aaron Retherford
Aug 17, 2012 | 2032 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Tribune photo by John Byrne - Reed senior Mark Nowaczewski has big shoes to fill if the Raiders want to approach last year’s record-breaking offensive numbers en route to a regional title.
Tribune photo by John Byrne - Reed senior Mark Nowaczewski has big shoes to fill if the Raiders want to approach last year’s record-breaking offensive numbers en route to a regional title.
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In 2004, the Reed football program began instituting some spread offense concepts after coach Ernie Howren and the rest of his staff noticed the emergence of the spread offense throughout the college ranks and at coaching clinics.

Howren felt the trend was heading in that direction.

Since 2005, Reed has been all spread offense and the offensive production has been impressive.

In the past three seasons, Reed racked up 14,680 yards of offense while scoring 1,481 points — an average of 367 yards and 37 points per game.

Last year was the most impressive by far. Reed won its second Northern 4A Region crown in the past three years, led by quarterback A.J. Silva.

Silva completed 207 of 320 passes for 43 touchdowns and 2,884 yards. He also was the team’s leading rusher, rumbling for 630 yards and 11 touchdowns, making him the easy choice for Player of the Year.

While Silva thrived in the spread offense, some don’t believe Reed excels because of the system but rather the studs it puts on the field year in and year out.

“They have really good athletes. I’m a firm believer in that if you have athletes, it doesn’t matter what you run,” SSHS football coach Scott Hare said. “Reed last year could have run the triple option, under center with three backs in the backfield and they would have been regional champion. The schemes have to be coached. Whatever you do, you have to believe in it. You have to coach it and the kids have to know it. Once all the intricacies of the coaching is done and the kids understand what to do, the kids are the ones who have to go out there and execute the play.

“Reed had kids the past couple years who are just flat out better than other kids that schools have. To be honest with you, I don’t think it would matter last year what Reed ran…I don’t think our kids are confused by what they run. You watch the film and Reed makes a play. They get out there and out-edge you and then they outplay you.”

As a former quarterback himself, Hare knows the importance of the signal caller to the spread offense. Hare said Reed continues to have talented players at the position.

The Raiders’ last five quarterbacks have either earned Player of the Year or Offensive Player of the Year honors.

Even Howren realizes the spread offense is just a system and he needs the players to go out and put it all out on the field.

“I think it’s a combination. If I was going to put it on one thing, it’s definitely the kids,” Howren said. “They’re the ones going out there and performing. We’ve been very fortunate with the kids we’ve had.”

Also making the Raiders a tough offense to handle is the fact they run a hurry-up offense. The Blue and Gold’s scoring drives last around two minutes more often than not.

“You do things to get an advantage and we feel it gives us a competitive advantage since we’re in better shape than most of the teams that we play against,” Howren said.
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