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‘Godot’ is a whole lot of nothing
by Ruth Anderson
Feb 04, 2009 | 1532 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Tribune/Cat Cutillo
Samuel Beckett's  tradgecomedy, "Waiting for Godot," debuts this Friday at the First United Methodist Church sanctuary, located at 209 W. First St. in Reno. Doors open at 7 p.m. and the show begins at 7:30 p.m.
Tribune/Cat Cutillo Samuel Beckett's tradgecomedy, "Waiting for Godot," debuts this Friday at the First United Methodist Church sanctuary, located at 209 W. First St. in Reno. Doors open at 7 p.m. and the show begins at 7:30 p.m.
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Reno play company Goodluck Macbeth will be holding their first performance of the season, “Waiting for Godot.”

The play, written by author Samuel Beckett, will be directed by company president, Scott Reeves, who calls the work “a humorous focus on humanity.”

The debut will take place Friday in the First United Methodist Church sanctuary, located at 209 W. First St. in Reno. Doors open at 7 p.m. and the show begins at 7:30 p.m.

An often cited description of “Godot” is “a strange little play in which nothing happens.” However, the play’s prosperity has proven otherwise. With its 1953 premier, “Waiting for Godot,” experienced immediate success, being praised by such playwright legends as Tennessee Williams and Thornton Wilder.

The play is separated into two acts which follow two consecutive days in the lives of a pair of men. The men, Estragon and Vladamir, are waiting for someone named Godot to arrive.

The play is set on a country road by a tree. Some critics have said this singular setting is intended to be non-descript, allowing the viewer to place themselves in the scene.

While the two men wait, they occupy themselves with a variety of activities, including, eating, sleeping, arguing, singing, exercising, swapping hats and contemplating suicide.

“Everybody is waiting for something,” Reeves said. “Life is not how people work together, it is how they stand one another, keeping sanity in a world that seems without cause.”

The play seems to hint at a pessimistic and cynical reflection of existence. Unsurprisingly, the play has been interpreted as allegorical commentary on religion, politics and society. Among these interpretations, the argument arises as to whether or not Beckett was exploring the existentialist meaning of human life.

“I sometimes think that over analyzing things detracts from it,” Reeves said. “From a writer’s perspective, I just try to maintain motion and keep humor.”

Although the play is centered around the frustration of waiting, the interactions between characters and witty dialogue add comedic spice to the work.

“Every character is dependent on the other characters,” Reeves said. “Role reversals are continuous in the play. They change in the play between acts and person’s lives and roles change with conversation.”

Performances will begin Friday and continue every Friday and Saturday evening until Feb. 28, with one Sunday matinee beginning at 3 p.m. on Feb. 22.

“I would credit Beckett with creating a realistic play that engages the audience,” Reeves said. “When it comes to really great work that people want to see again and again, dialogue becomes a reference point. The cultural references to this play are phenomenal.”

Tickets can be purchased in advance at Dharma Books located at 11 N. Sierra St. #107, or Wild River Grille located 17 S. Virgina St. Suite #180. Call 322-3716 for group ticket sales and reservations. Tickets are available at the door for $15 general admission and $10 for students and seniors.
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