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Morros begins cross-country trek for brain trauma awareness
by Aaron Retherford
Jun 20, 2011 | 964 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Tribune photo by Dan McGee - Josh Morros, a former Kawasaki Team Green pro and off-road champion, suffered a life-changing brain injury during a race almost three years ago. He has devoted his life to raising awareness for brain injuries and raising money for The Brain Initiative.
Tribune photo by Dan McGee - Josh Morros, a former Kawasaki Team Green pro and off-road champion, suffered a life-changing brain injury during a race almost three years ago. He has devoted his life to raising awareness for brain injuries and raising money for The Brain Initiative.
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In August of 2008, a crash during a motocross event left Josh Morros comatose with severe head trauma.

Since then, he’s battled through rehab in order to try to get back to where he was when he was one of the area’s most promising young motocross stars.

During his recovery, he and his family have also worked hard to bring awareness to the severity of brain injuries and that quest is taking Morros cross country.

Monday, Morros started his journey from the Reno Cycling and Fitness Club and it will hopefully end after he crosses 10 states and reaches the Brain Injury Association of America in Vienna, VA. Along the way, Morros will stop and speak at youth groups, fire stations and community centers in order to promote Safe Kids and The Brain Initiative, which provides information about the care and prevention of traumatic brain injuries.

Morros wants to spread the word to children who might not understand the seriousness of a head injury. If a kid continues playing after getting hurt, that second hit could leave him or her severely disabled.

“I really want to bring awareness to the racing community and any other contact sport to always be ready for that what if,” Morros said. “You know that ‘what if I crash and break my leg or what if I crash and hit my head and it causes me to be severely disabled for the rest of my life.’ Just put out those necessary precautions where it brings more knowledge.”

Nearly three years later, Morros still feels lingering effects of his own accident. He said he notices it in his speech when he has to stop to think of what words he is supposed to use. Also, he stutters from time to time.

After his accident, his endurance was admittedly horrible. He began riding a bicycle to improve his endurance. He also worked out with a trainer at a gym on a daily basis, who gave Morros tips on how to train the rest of his life.

“Now, I just feel I need another couple notches on my motorcycle and I will be back to where I was,” Morros said.

Morros’ parents will be following him across the country in their motor home during his travels to Virginia.

“I think being a parent, they’re going to be nervous a little bit,” Morros said. “I feel I’ve always exceeded their expectations, so it kind of surprises them. I’m even nervous for that first day, but once we get going and settle in, we’ll all get comfortable.”

The trek is scheduled to take 40 days with Morros riding over 100 miles on many of the days through the Midwest. In all, he will travel over 2,700 miles.

“I’m actually really excited for it. I know it’s going to be hot and grueling,” he said. “I just got done riding an 80-mile loop around Reno, and I know I could have gone even farther. I know it’s going to be long, but I’m willing to take it on, and I’m going to be able to take it on.”
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