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Not Far to Mars
by Tribune Staff
Apr 24, 2012 | 926 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Tribune/John Byrne - Joseph Mahsman, staff computation and visualization scientist at the Desert Research Institute, uses remote controls to give Dilworth students a tour of the surface of Mars.
Tribune/John Byrne - Joseph Mahsman, staff computation and visualization scientist at the Desert Research Institute, uses remote controls to give Dilworth students a tour of the surface of Mars.
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Tribune/John Byrne - Dilworth students (clockwise from left) Karen Martinez, Elizabeth Cuna, Gustazo Bapilla, Bailey Ramynke and Hunter Peterson show off their virtual reality glasses.
Tribune/John Byrne - Dilworth students (clockwise from left) Karen Martinez, Elizabeth Cuna, Gustazo Bapilla, Bailey Ramynke and Hunter Peterson show off their virtual reality glasses.
slideshow
RENO — A group of students from Dilworth STEM Academy in Sparks got a tour of the surface of Mars on Tuesday courtesy of Steven Squyres, Ph.D., this year’s recipient of the Desert Research Institute Nevada Medal, in DRI’s DRIVE6 virtual reality facility.

“Students from Dilworth have been working on an atmospheric exploration project using weather balloons to carry their ideas from their schoolyard to the upper reaches of the atmosphere,” Squyres said. “I am excited to hear about their experiments, take them on a tour of Mars and spend time with them at DRI.”
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Not Far to Mars by Tribune Staff


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