Check Out Our Sports Photo Galleries Contact Us
New book examines ecological history of Great Basin habitat
by Tribune Staff
Mar 29, 2012 | 933 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
“Nevada’s Changing Wildlife Habitat” by George E. Gruell explains the transformation in the Great Basin ecology over time.
“Nevada’s Changing Wildlife Habitat” by George E. Gruell explains the transformation in the Great Basin ecology over time.
slideshow
RENO — For millennia, the ecology of the Great Basin has evolved because of climate change and the impacts of human presence. “Nevada’s Changing Wildlife Habitat” is the first book to explain the transformations in the plants and animals of this region over time and how they came about. Using data gleaned from archaeological and anthropological studies, numerous historical documents, repeat photography and several natural sciences, the authors examine changes in vegetation and their impact on wildlife species and the general health of the environment. They also outline the choices that current users and managers of rangelands face in being good stewards of this harsh but fragile environment and its wildlife.

George E. Gruell is a retired wildlife biologist for the U.S. Forest Service. He has published widely on vegetation succession, wildlife habitat and fire ecology in the West and has pioneered the use of repeat photography for recording ecological changes over time.

Sherman Swanson is a range and riparian specialist for the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Service and associate professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Science at the University of Nevada, Reno.

“This book is very timely and thought-provoking. Anyone interested in wildlife populations, wildlife habitat and natural resource management needs to read it,” said Ken McAdoo, a specialist in rangeland resources with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Service in Elko County. “Because some of the topics are so controversial — for example, the benefits and impacts of wildfires and livestock grazing — readers will be challenged to think deeply about the ecological relationships and processes we see unfolding in our landscapes.”

For more information, visit www.unpress.nevada.edu.
Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
Featured Businesses